Small Wonder

An UWS prewar studio with Art Deco detail and a famous pedigree, for $625,000

The living area is small, but packed with personality, and has the unit’s original steel door frames, Art Deco doorknobs, beamed ceilings, and hardwood flooring (with inlaid border)

Corcoran

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Original, 1920s-era Art Deco details—including old-school doorknobs, tiles, and light fixtures— bring a nostalgic vibe to this Upper West Side studio, 320 Central Park West, #7E, in The Ardsley, a co-op building that was designed by renowned architect Emery Roth, and was also once home to singer Barbra Streisand and lyricist Lorenz Hart.

But a tiny under-mount refrigerator in the kitchen (in place of a full-sized one), as well as a $625,000 asking price—higher than the neighborhood’s $549,000 median for a studio, according to StreetEasy—might turn some buyers off.

Enter the apartment through an entrance foyer—a rarity in a studio—with a sizeable coat closet. There’s also a large walk-in closet adjacent to the living room.

That living area is small, but packed with personality, and has the unit’s original steel door frames, Art Deco doorknobs, beamed ceilings, and hardwood flooring (with inlaid border)—all of which appear to still be in decent shape.

Large windows usher tons of sunlight into the room, which currently contains a cozy seating area where a pair of couches face each other over a petite coffee table, and a sleeping area by the wall that looks large enough to accommodate a good-sized bed.

The windowed kitchen is nice, but the absence of a full-sized fridge is definitely felt. This is clearly meant for folks who order in more often than they cook for themselves. The blue-gray cabinets are striking, as is the replica Art Deco hardware, but one wonders why there isn’t an upper level of cabinets to maximize storage in this small space. Rounding out the room are gray chrome-trimmed laminate countertops, kitschy black-and-white tiled flooring, and an Art Deco pendant light up top.

Step into the black-and-white bathroom to travel back in time. The apartment’s original pedestal sink, tub, black-and-white Art Deco tile, mosaic floor, and period medicine cabinet all look to be in surprisingly good condition.

The white glove, full-service prewar building went co-op in 1971. The pet-friendly building has a newly renovated lobby, a fitness center, on-site laundry, a children’s playroom, two bike rooms, storage rooms, and a lending library. Maintenance is $1,510 a month.