ADVERTORIAL

Exposed brick adds character to this five-bedroom loft in Chelsea.

Corcoran

There's something magical about seeing exposed brick in an apartment, especially in a place as steeped in history as New York City. An exposed brick wall (or ceiling) reveals the past and telegraphs the character and craftsmanship of a building. A backdrop of rough-hewn, hand-laid brick also integrates beautifully with modern decor, providing a pop of color to showcase the minimalist design currently en vogue.

So let's look at some fine examples, shall we? Here are five apartments around the city with exposed brick, all available now.

36 Bleecker St., #2E, Greenwich Village

We didn't say these would all be exposed brick walls, did we? In this three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath, chic prewar condominium, the eye is drawn upward to the original 12-foot barrel vault brick ceilings. They're the dominant feature of the 350-square-foot great room, which also has three large windows looking out onto a courtyard garden designed by landscape artist Ken Smith. That room flows into an open kitchen with a 10-foot-by-15-foot Carrara marble center island, a six-burner Wolf range, and other professional-grade appliances including a Miele dishwasher, Sub-Zero refrigerator, and wine fridge.

A windowed gallery leads to the master bedroom suite, with wood-framed windows that also overlook the courtyard. The en suite white marble bathroom has a double vanity, a glass-framed shower, and a large closet. Two additional bedrooms are in a separate wing of the home, where you'll also find a luxurious bathroom with a double vanity and soaking tub. Off the entry foyer, you'll find a guest powder room and full-size laundry room.

The home, which totals more than 2,100 square feet in all, is part of The Schumacher, a historic Queen Anne Victorian and Romanesque Revival-style building, which was refashioned into 20 unique residences by the famed architect Morris Adjmi. Full-service amenities include a 24-hour doorman, fitness center, library, playroom, bicycle storage, and a lushly landscaped roof terrace with Wolf outdoor gas grill. The home is listed for $5.7 million with monthly common charges at $3,206.

131 West 24th St., #5-6, Chelsea/Hudson Yards

This five-bedroom, three-bath home is an ode to loft living: At 4,200 square feet across two floors, it affords ultimate luxury with industrial-modern aesthetics in the heart of Manhattan. The first of two private, keyed elevators opens onto a sleek and stupendously large kitchen, with both formal and casual dining areas looking out across the great room. Natural light abounds thanks to sun-flooded, south-facing windows and a double-height ceiling. Other features include exposed and painted brick; a catwalk balcony and a stairway; and exposures to the north, south, and east, with large-scale windows that mute the city's noise and frame lovely Chelsea views.

A long, elegant hallway from the living room leads to a serene and private master suite. Spacious enough for a king-size bed and plenty of furniture, the room also features south-facing windows with an automatic shade, a walk-in closet, a home gym/yoga room, and a master bath with a walk-in rain shower and soaking tub. The second elevator entry is located in this part of the apartment.

Elsewhere, there are four more bedrooms accompanied by two full bathrooms. On the first level, just off the great room is a second living area, outfitted with two working desks and a cozy couch. On the second level, a library is open to the great room's soaring ceilings. There is an automatic, dropdown projection screen for movies or presentations—perfect for working from home.

The apartment is equipped with zoned air and heating plus abundant storage (both in the apartment and two basement areas). The building is a boutique, six-unit co-op with one commercial tenant and an exterior brick façade that was repointed in 2020, in accordance with Local Law 11. The home is listed for $4.5 million, with low monthly maintenance charges of $3,500.

60 Pineapple St., #6D, Brooklyn Heights

This two-bedroom, one-bath prewar turn-key treasure provides nearly 1,200 square feet of living space and views of the NYC skyline. The massive main bedroom boasts custom built-ins and a walk-in closet, and there's bonus space off the entryway, ideal for a nursery or a nicely proportioned home office. (Or a pet room—Fido is welcome here.) The modern kitchen is outfitted with stainless steel appliances, while the expansive, loft-like living room (shown above) has exposed brick. The bathroom has been recently renovated with subway tile, a rain shower, and herringbone floor tile. Several closets throughout the home mean you won't lack for storage space—plus there's a private storage unit that comes with the apartment. Other building features include an elevator, bike room, package room, and central laundry. The co-op building, which is located in the north end of Brooklyn Heights near the promenade, is well-maintained by a dedicated staff, including a live-in super, part-time doorman, and porter. It's listed for $1.225 million, and maintenance charges are $2,143 per month.

940 Fulton St., Penthouse B, Clinton Hill

This loft penthouse, built in 1930 and converted in 2011, combines historic Brooklyn details with modern amenities, and makes the most of its space with 12-foot-high ceilings. Architectural details include an exposed brick wall encasing the original decorative inlay fireplace and restored wide-plank pine flooring, while modern upgrades include an open kitchen with a farmhouse sink, a Fisher & Paykel refrigerator, a dishwasher, a gas range, a washer/dryer, split-zone A/C, and video intercom. Two loft spaces in the apartment offer sleeping quarters and ample additional storage space. The condo building—The Fulton Lofts—has an unbeatable Brooklyn location, just off St. James Place and a short walk from Grand Army Plaza. The loft is listed at $610,000, and common charges are only $350 per month.

443 12th St., #1H, Park Slope

Two exposed brick walls bracket this loft at the coveted, converted Ansonia Storage Warehouse. This unique unit spans two levels, with more than 1,800 square feet of livable space. The upper level has 13-and-a half-foot ceiling heights and is home to the master suite, an additional bedroom, and a flexible study/sleeping space. The elevated master suite appears to float above the space, and is exceptionally designed, with framed glass transoms, a sliding barn door, more exposed brick, and ample closet space. The additional bedroom (which can also be used as a study) has a loft accessible by a playful ladder for an elevated reading space—or a dedicated gaming area for kids. The open-plan living room is surrounded by floor-to-ceiling storage; one closet even has a home office tucked away. A full spa bath completes this floor.

One level down is the centerpiece of the loft: the renovated cooks' kitchen, which has geranium-color millwork, Pietra Cardosa stone countertops, and top-of-the-line appliances. It opens up to a contemporary dining area and a large, additional family room. This level holds another cozy bedroom and a newly built, full-spa bath, plus a full-sized laundry room.

Loft-like details throughout the home include hardwood oak floors, exposed brick and beams, cable-railing, columns, and mezzanine spaces. A short elevator ride to the building's fifth floor takes you to a finished roof deck with unobstructed views of the Manhattan skyline and the Statue of Liberty. The roof space is finished with new couches, new picnic tables, a garden, and grills for casual, al-fresco dining (when it warms up, of course). Pets are welcome—after all, the building is known for its relaxed atmosphere and close-knit community. The co-op is listed $1.785 million, and the monthly maintenance charges are $1,243.

All of these stylish homes are available now. Connect with a Corcoran agent to inquire about a showing.

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