Small Wonder

A well designed—if tiny—Hell's Kitchen studio with some pretty cool details

By Leah Hochbaum Rosner | July 25, 2017 - 9:59AM 

At just 410 square feet, this $425,000 studio at 433 West 54th Street in Hell’s Kitchen is truly a Small Wonder. But with lots of light and a space-saving Murphy bed, the recently renovated second floor unit feels surprisingly roomy.

The co-op’s living space has a wall of exposed brick that’s been painted white to give the room a more expansive air, as well as a black accent wall by the windows that makes a strong visual statement and adds some dramatic flair to the place. There’s also a wall bed that can easily be folded away if the apartment’s occupant wants more space to entertain or simply to move around.

You probably wouldn’t expect to find an eat-in kitchen in a unit this size, but there it is, with a double dose of windows, a wood-paneled ceiling, an island at which to both chop and dine, and recessed lighting on dimmers—making it the perfect place for a romantic (yet cramped) dinner with that special someone (although if it’s romantic, you may not mind that). The only hitch here seems to be that the room isn’t large enough to accommodate a full-sized refrigerator, offering a small under-counter fridge to the right of the sink, instead. That’s fine if you spend more time in restaurants than in front of your own range. It’s less fine if you like to cook and won’t have enough room to store all of your ingredients.

There’s also a modern windowed bathroom with tiles throughout the space (which should render it extremely easy to clean) and storage both under the sink and above the toilet (which is especially important in a unit as teeny as this one).

The pre-war tenement-style building in which this dwelling is found welcomes both cats and dogs, has on-site laundry and common storage, and permits both pieds–à–terre and sublets—a rarity for a co-op. Maintenance is a relatively reasonable $810 a month.

 

 

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