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Heat complaints to 311 are up 5 percent this winter

All five boroughs saw increases in the number of unique heat violations according to RentHop's annual report.

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New Yorkers barely cleaned up from last week’s snow when a few more inches fell on Sunday—and there’s more to come this week, along with freezing temperatures. The cold is a dire problem this year for many New Yorkers who live in apartments without adequate heat and are staying home because of the pandemic.

RentHop’s annual report on heat complaints finds that tenants who live in the Erasmus neighborhood of Brooklyn; Norwood, the Bronx; and Hamilton Heights, Manhattan tend to suffer year after year.

This year’s report says calls to 311 about a lack of heat increased 5.4 percent from October 1st 2020 through February 2nd 2021 compared to the same period last winter. All five boroughs saw increases in the number of unique heat violations.

The Bronx has the greatest number of unique complaints and Kingsbridge Heights ranks the worse among over 180 NYC neighborhoods, with 1,226 complaints, 34 percent more than the same period last year. Complaints also skyrocketed in Parkchester, the report said.

Some addresses with a high number of heat complaints include: 1713 Harman St. in Queens, 2176 Tiebout Ave. and 2040 Bronxdale Ave. in the Bronx, and 2305 Bedford Ave. in Brooklyn.

The interactive map above shows the “coldness” of each NYC neighborhood. Darker shades indicate higher numbers of heat complaints.

What to do if your apartment is cold

Keep in mind that heat season runs from October 1st through May. During the day, from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., when the outside temperature falls below 55 degrees, landlords are required to make the inside temperature at least 68 degrees. During the overnight hours, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m, landlords are required to make the inside temperature at least 62 degrees.

If you don’t have enough heat, contact your building super, manager, or owner to let them know. If you don’t get a response or resolution, call 311, which should alert the Department of Housing Preservation and Development and may trigger an inspection and fine.