Would You Rather?

Which is the better neighborhood perk: Proximity to the subway or access to a park?

By Lambeth Hochwald | May 15, 2017 - 11:59AM 

When it comes to New York City amenities, would you rather have the convenience of living a block from the subway or the easy-access-to-tranquility that comes from living near a park? Here, five New Yorkers share what’s on their wish lists:

Give me the subway The Second Avenue Q train has been a real game-changer for me, thanks to an entrance to the subway on my corner (I used to have to walk 10-plus minutes to the 4/5/6 each way). Let’s face it—after a morning workout at the gym the last thing I want to do is walk even more. I use the subway two times a day and the park maybe twice a year realistically, so convenience to the train is key! —Shara, Upper East Side

Park proximity please Living in New York City has made me lazier than I’ve ever been because I require that everything I could ever need is within a three-block radius. That said, I’d rather live a block from the park because I find myself taking more car services these days than the subway. —Mira Hell’s Kitchen (pictured below)

MTA any day I would rather live a block from the subway because you can take the subway to the park. Duh. –Nicole, Astoria

My dog (and kid) needs grass I would rather live a block away from a park because it's much easier for my dog to pee in a park versus a subway station. We also have a three-year-old so the park is a must. It’s the New York equivalent to a backyard and it provides us plenty of sanity, especially during the winter! —Jeannie, Upper West Side

We’re a town of walkers If the weather was consistently warm, I would choose to walk anywhere in the city over taking the smelly subway. After all, the city is no longer than 14 miles so I can promote a healthier lifestyle and avoid a dreadful atmosphere.—Abbe, Midtown East

Verdict: We may be urban dwellers ,but we still appreciate our parks and their little bit of nature more than being close to the train.

 

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