Affordable Housing

How to rent in Yorkville for as little as $607/month

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Hoping to land an affordable rental on the Upper East Side? Applications opened yesterday on NYC Housing Connect for 47 affordable apartments at 205 East 93rd Street in Yorkville. The apartments are part of a larger complex from the Related Companies, which came under fire for replacing a neighborhood playground; it will also include a school on-site for children with learning disabilities, as well as an Equinox gym, according to reports from last March.

All told, in the affordable component there are three one-bedrooms available for $607/month; 17 one-bedrooms at $769/month; five two-bedrooms for $736/month; and 22 two-bedrooms for $930/month, for renters with household incomes between $22,218 and $43,150, depending on apartment and family size. (Check out the full requirements below, and click to enlarge.)



According to the listing, amenities will include a 24-hour doorman and concierge, an outdoor terrace, and in-unit washers and dryers in every apartment. For an extra charge, party rooms, a children's playroom, a teen lounge, storage, and bike storage will also be available.

If you think you might qualify, you can apply online via NYC Housing Connect, or request a paper application by sending a self-addressed postcard or envelope 92nd & 3rd Associates LLC, 1357 Broadway, Box 438, New York, NY 10018. Be sure not to send more than one application—that could get you disqualified from the running—and get those applications in by the February 1st deadline.

Note: BrickUnderground is not affiliated with New York City public housing. If you are interested in applying to this or other affordable housing developments, please go to the NYC Housing Connect website for information and instructions.


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