Make the weak Euro work for you: Vacation homes across the pond for around $200,000 or under

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If your getaway fantasies skew more towards the European oasis of Under the Tuscan Sun than the lake-side retreat in  What About Bob?  (or for that matter, the beachy locales in Jaws), you're in luck. With the euro still weak, now may be a good time to consider buying a vacation home in Europe. Start your hunt (or day-dreaming) right here.

How do you solve a NYC real estate problem like exorbitant price tags? Head to Fürstenfeld, Austria, where, for the price equivalent to a down payment in this city, you could be the owner of a three-bedroom with central heating and a carport. Asking price: 100,000 euros (or, in US currency, $113,910).

The house itself may be called a cottage, but there's nothing diminutive about this entire property a ten-minute stroll from the Portugese village of Alegrete. First, the main accommodations offer two bedrooms; the one-acre grounds also include a forest, fruit trees and perfectly romantic-sounding stone ruins. Asking price: 105,000 euros ($119,229).

This three-bedroom is in the village of Ano Aprovato on the Greek island of Andros. (Given the country's fiscal woes, many other things are cheaper in Greece now, too.) Built in 2005, it's been massively discounted from the original asking of 385,000 euros, and has air-conditioning, a small garden planted with olive trees, and views of the Aegean Sea. Asking price: 180,000 euros ($199,993).

For the price of an outer-borough studio or one-bedroom, you can get a 700-square-foot two-bedroom in a proper chateau in Seine et Marne, a town on on the outskirts of Paris. The estate comes with a pool and tennis court, too. Asking price: 189,490 euros ($215,169).


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