5 New York homes where you can live in a landmark

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The 50th anniversary of New York's landmark legislation is upon us, and to celebrate this blessed event, the New York School of Interior Design just launched an entire exhibition dedicated to city's breathtaking, landmarked interiors like those at the Williamsburg Savings Bank. Naturally, this got us to thinking: what if we could live in a landmark? We combed the listings and found five lovely, landmarked homes where you can live in a part of New York history:

Standing out in a sea of brownstones, this $3,995,000 Romanesque Revival Park Slope two-family is currently divided up into an owner's triplex and a garden-level one bedroom, meaning you can generate some income while enjoying your stately digs. We could easily lose an entire afternoon reading curled up with a book next to one of those huge windows, or sipping wine on the balcony.

For the low, low price of $48 million, you can snap up 684 Park Avenue, an 11,000 square foot home designed by the same firm responsible for the Brooklyn museum and the original, dearly departed Penn Station. It was built in 1926 in the neo-Federal style, and is situated on a block full of landmarked Georgian-inspired buildings, meaning you can use that outdoor terrace to invite the neighbors over and gloat about all your collective architectural cred.

Looking for more of an investment property? This $9.5 million 19th century West Village townhouse  is currently set up with a restaurant occupying the ground floor and basement, and the rest of the building divvied up into three apartments. However, the listing notes that it will be delivered vacant, so if you want to turn the whole thing into an opulent private residence, that option is available to you.

One more over-the-top UES option: this $63 million limestone neo-Renaissance townhouse on East 81st, which in addition to expansive spaces for entertaining (like the above dining room), includes 10 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, and seven half-baths.


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