I moved to Herald Towers a few months ago, not because I wanted to meet and greet all the tourists that flock to see Macy's--the world’s largest department store--but for convenience. 

As in, I only need to walk 20 yards (probably less) to get to wherever I want to go. Every form of public transportation is less than a minute away. There’s the B,D,F,M,N,Q,R and if I walk a bit west and there’s the 1,2,3 lines and east there's the 6.  Penn Station is one block away.

I can go anywhere, anytime. I have friends who live in the Bronx and Brooklyn and I never reject a night out. Getting there and getting home at 4 in the morning isn’t a hassle. 

When I tell people that I live by Herald Square, specifically in between the huge Forever 21 and The Gap on 34th between Fifth and Sixth, a majority of them look at me with disbelief. Why on earth would you want to live in a tourist trap?

People avoid Midtown when they can and come here only when their friends are visiting from out of state drag them. 

Sure, it’s noisy with cab drivers constantly honking, crowds of tourists pushing and shoving their way looking for shopping deals, and police sirens blaring throughout the day and night.

But living at Herald Towers lightens my wallet (I share a studio and pay $1,200).

And living by Herald Square has really benefited me. For instance, I recently had a paper due and left it at my apartment. Luckily, Fordham University--where I go to school--isn’t far, and going back to get it was a breeze. 

Another time I had an interview to go to but realized I didn’t have any dress socks to go with my professional attire. What did I do? I walked across the street and bought some great socks at Uniqlo (one of my favorite stores).

And when I’m craving Korean food late at night, I feed that craving by walking to K-Town.

Maybe I’m just an optimist, or maybe I’m crazy. I just know that every morning when I step outside the building, the city is already energized and awake. My morning drowsiness dissipates instantly when I step out. The energy is contagious. 

Would I live here twenty years from now? If I have the finances, absolutely.

 


Living Next to....explores the good, the bad, and the memorable of living near someplace other would rather not.  Have a story to share? Let us know--we'd love to hear!

 

See all Living Next To

Related:

Transitions: From Central Harlem to Midtown West

Living next to a "play street": Don't even think about working from home

Serial renter: 3 tips for finding the best neighborhood for you

7 things to ask the neighbors before you move

Soundproofing to save your sanity: Affordable options for renters

How to find a quiet apartment

Living next to a grocery store: Convenience with a heavy dose of noise


 

Note: BrickUnderground articles occasionally include Featured Partners and Resource Directory members when their expertise is relevant to the story.

About:

Living Next To captures the good, the bad, and the memorable of living near something others would rather not